Spark’s New Broadband Plans: Are You Being Ripped Off?

If you are a Spark Unplan broadband customer, it’s time to check your account details, because you could be paying more than you need to.

You might have noticed the ads for Spark broadband’s new deals on TV. Its new Essential Fibre and Max Fibre plans come with free Netflix, which is worth a cool $18.49 per month.

That’s not a bad deal considering the prices of the two new plans:

  • Essential Fibre 102/22mbps: $85 per month
  • Max Fibre 860/501mbps: $100 per month

However while Spark has made a big deal of its new Netflix-centred plans, it hasn’t made a big deal of informing its existing broadband customers that they are now paying more than they need to for redundant plans.

Spark broadband’s old Unplan plans

Sparks old Unplan plans were a bit of a dog’s dinner. They worked on a three-tier usage price plan:

  • 0GB – 60GB per month: $89
  • 60GB – 120GB per month: $99
  • 120GB – onwards per month: $109

But if you were a modern home with multiple devices and a bunch of streaming services, you were, always, going to be paying $109 per month for your unlimited broadband.

spark_logo

Spark broadband’s new plans

Spark’s new plans are a lot better, and a lot more concise. Three plans and three new price points. However, the kicker is that if you’re an existing Spark customer on one of its old plans, you’ll not automatically be transferred to a corresponding new plan. It’s up to you to make the switch, or to continue paying more than you need to for Spark broadband.

Everyday Fibre 50mbps/10mbps: $70 per month

This is Spark’s slowest plan, but still fine for streaming.

But if you’re still on the equivalent old Unplan Fibre BASIC plan, you’ll still be paying $86 per month for unlimited broadband.

That’s $192 per year you can save by switching.

Essential Fibre 102/22mbps: $85 per month

This is Spark’s standard plan.

But if you’re still on the equivalent old Unplan Netflix Fibre 100 plan, you’ll still be paying $99 per month for unlimited broadband.

That’s $168 per year you can save by switching.

Max Fibre 860/501mbps: $100 per month

This is Spark’s fastest plan.

If you’re still on the equivalent old Unplan Netflix Fibre Max plan, you’ll still be paying $120 per month for unlimited broadband.

That’s $240 per year you can save by switching.

These are some big savings that you could be missing out on. We must add that the new plans don’t come with a free modem, unlike the old plans. So you’ll need to BYO modem, or pay an extra $106.20 for a new Spark one. However, if you’re already a Spark customer with a recent fibre connection, then chances are you’ll be able to continue to use your existing Spark modem at no extra cost.

Canstar Blue Most Satisfied Customers Broadband 2021

It pays to shop around for the best broadband

At Canstar Blue, we always advise people to regularly check their telco and power contracts. Firms like Spark are sneaky. They are always revising their products to entice new customers, but are less enthusiastic about informing their existing customers of their new deals.

But that’s where Canstar Blue can help. To help you get a clearer picture of broadband providers in NZ, we rate all the big providers annually. We survey thousands of broadband customers and ask them to score their providers across categories including Value for Money, Network Performance and Customer Service.

Canstar Blue’s latest review of NZ internet providers compares NOW, 2degrees, Bigpipe, Contact, MyRepublic, Nova Energy, Orcon, Slingshot, Spark, Stuff Fibre, Trustpower and Vodafone, and awards the best our 5 Star rating:

See Our Ratings Methodology

The table above is an abridged version of our full research, so to find out more about NZ’s best broadband providers, just click on the big button at the bottom of this story.

Compare broadband providers for free with Canstar!


About the author of this page

Bruce PitchersThis report was written by Canstar’s Editor, Bruce Pitchers. Bruce began his career writing about pop culture, and spent a decade in sports journalism. More recently, he’s applied his editing and writing skills to the world of finance and property. Prior to Canstar, he worked as a freelancer, including for The Australian Financial Review, the NZ Financial Markets Authority, and for real estate companies on both sides of the Tasman.


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